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Christian woman testimony: she believed her purpose in life was to write

“The longest way must have its close – the gloomiest night will wear on to a morning.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin    

“When you get into a tight place and everything goes against you until it seems that you cannot hold on for a minute longer, never give up then, for that is just the place and time when the tide will turn.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe 

“Once in an age God sends to some of us a friend who loves in us, not a false-imagining, an unreal character, but looking through the rubbish of our imperfections, loves in us the divine ideal of our nature,–loves, not the man that we are, but the angel that we may be.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe

“…the heart has no tears to give,–it drops only blood, bleeding itself away in silence.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin

“The truth is the kindest thing we can give folks in the end.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe

“So much has been said and sung of beautiful young girls, why don’t somebody wake up to the beauty of old women?”
Harriet Beecher Stowe

“Never give up, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe

“Any mind that is capable of a real sorrow is capable of good.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin    

“Religion! Is what you hear at church religion? Is that which can bend and turn, and descend and ascend, to fit every crooked phase of selfish, worldly society, religion? Is that religion which is less scrupulous, less generous, less just, less considerate for man, than even my own ungodly, worldly, blinded nature? No! When I look for religion, I must look for something above me, and not something beneath.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin    

“So subtle is the atmosphere of opinion that it will make itself felt without words.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe

“It takes years and maturity to make the discovery that the power of faith is nobler than the power of doubt; and that there is a celestial wisdom in the ingenuous propensity to trust, which belongs to honest and noble natures.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe, The Pearl of Orr’s Island: A Story of the Coast of Maine

“I did not write it. (Uncle Tom’s Cabin) God wrote it. I merely did his dictation.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe

biographical excerpts from: https://www.harrietbeecherstowecenter.org/hbs/

Harriet believed her purpose in life was to write. Her most famous work exposed the truth about the greatest social injustice of her day – human slavery.

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) published more than 30 books, but it was her best-selling anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin which catapulted her to international celebrity and secured her place in history. But Uncle Tom’s Cabin was not Stowe’s only work. Her broad range of interests resulted in such varied publications as children’s text books, advice books on homemaking and childrearing, biographies and religious studies. The informal, conversational style of her many novels permitted her to reach audiences that more scholarly or argumentative works would not, and encouraged everyday people to address such controversial topics as slavery, religious reform, and gender roles. Harriet Beecher Stowe believed her actions could make a positive difference. Her words changed the world.

Harriet-Beecher-Stowe

Harriet Elisabeth Beecher was born June 14, 1811 in Litchfield, CT to the Rev. Lyman Beecher (1775-1863) and Roxanna Foote Beecher (1775- 1816); the sixth of 11 children. The Beechers expected their children to shape their world:

All seven sons became ministers, then the most effective way to influence society

Oldest daughter Catharine pioneered education for women

Youngest daughter Isabella was a founder of the National Women’s Suffrage Association

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