best thoughts · daughter of God · love story · woman story

Christian woman testimony: she cannot love without giving

AmyCarmichael with Indianchildren“Give me the Love that leads the way
The Faith that nothing can dismay
The Hope no disappointments tire
The Passion that’ll burn like fire
Let me not sink to be a clod
Make me Thy fuel, Flame of God”
Amy Carmichael

“You can give without loving, but you cannot love without giving.”
Amy Carmichael

“He said “Love…as I have loved you.” We cannot love too much.”
Amy Carmichael

“One can give without loving, but one cannot love without giving”
Amy Carmichael

“He hath never failed thee yet.
Never will His love forget.
O fret not thyself nor let
Thy heart be troubled,
Neither let it be afraid.”
Amy Carmichael

“The word comfort is from two Latin words meaning “with” and “strong” – He is with us to make us strong. Comfort is not soft, weakening commiseration; it is true, strengthening love.”
Amy Carmichael, Kohila : the shaping of an Indian nurse    

“If by doing some work which the undiscerning consider ‘not spiritual work’ I can best help others, and I inwardly rebel, thinking it is the spiritual for which I crave, when in truth it is the interesting and exciting, then I know nothing of Calvary love.”
Amy Carmichael, If    

“If I am afraid to speak the truth lest I lose affection, or lest the one concerned should say, “You do not understand”, or because I fear to lose my reputation for kindness; if I put my own good name before the other’s highest good, then I know nothing of Calvary love.”
Amy Carmichael, If

“The best training is to learn to accept everything as it comes, as from Him whom our soul loves. The tests are always unexpected things, not great things that can be written up, but the common little rubs of life, silly little nothings, things you are ashamed of minding one scrap”
Amy Carmichael, A Very Present Help: Life Messages of Great Christans

“If my attitude be on of fear, not faith, about the one who has disappointed me; if I say “Just what I expected,” if a fall occurs, then I know nothing of Calvary Love.”
Amy Carmichael, If    

“If I do not feel far more for the grieved Saviour than for my worried self when troublesome things occur, then I know nothing of Calvary love.”
Amy Carmichael, If    

“If souls can suffer alongside, and I hardly know it, because the spirit of discernment is not in me, then I know nothing of Calvary love.”
Amy Carmichael, If    

“If I make much of anything appointed, magnify it secretly to myself or insidiously to others; if I let them think it “hard,” if I look back longingly upon what used to be, and linger among the byways of memory, so that my power to help is weakened, then I know nothing of Calvary love.”
Amy Carmichael, If    

“Hereby perceive we the love of God, because He laid down His life for us, and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren.” How often I think of that ‘ought.’ No sugary sentiment there. Just the stern, glorious trumpet call, OUGHT. But can words tell the joy buried deep within? Mine cannot. It laughs at words.”
Amy Carmichael

Read her brief biography here: http://www.gfamissions.org/missionary-biographies/carmichael-amy-1867-1951.html

Excerpts: AMY CARMICHAEL 1867-1951

One of the best-known and respected missionaries of the first half of the 20th century was Amy Carmichael.  Her 35 books have blessed countless thousands.  One who knew her well gives this testimony:  “Miss Carmichael was a blessing to all who came into intimate and understanding contact with her radiant life.  She was the most Christ-like character I ever met, and her life was the most fragrant, the most joyfully sacrificial that I have ever known.”

 Amy Carmichael was born in 1867 into a well-to-do North Ireland Christian family.  In her teen years, she was educated at a Wesleyan Methodist boarding school; and at age 13, while still in boarding school, she accepted Christ as Savior.  When she was age 18, her father died, leaving the family in difficult financial circumstances as he had given a large personal loan that was not repaid.  The family moved to Belfast.  There she became involved in visiting in the slums, and seeing the terrible conditions under which many women and girls worked in the factories, she began a ministry with these women.  It was a work based on faith alone in God, and He met the needs in most remarkable ways…Amy received her Macedonian call in 1892 at the age of 24..After about one year in England, she returned to the field, this time to India.  She arrived in Madras in November of 1895, a discouraged, confused, and ill young Irish woman. ..A life-changing experience took place in 1901.  A little five-year-old girl, named Pearl Eyes by Amy, was brought to her by an Indian woman.  The child had been sold by the mother to the temple, and there she was being prepared and taught all the degradation of temple prostitution…

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