biography · thoughts · travel · why not woman · woman story · women writers · writing

“You are much, much more.” she wrote

maeve-binchy_grandeI decided to post some quotes of a much loved Irish writer of stories. She wrote of simple ordinary everyday people, but their stories are credible and real. Of love and deceit, family drama, wealth and poverty, of friendship and courage. Families and people who aren’t always quite what they seem.

Maeve Binchy Quotes

“I’ll understand if you don’t want me. But I will be heartbroken. You are all I ever dreamed of and hoped for. You are much, much more. Please know that I didn’t think I was mean-minded. But I realize I am. I don’t want you to put your arms around me and say it’s all right, that you forgive me. I want you to be sure that you do, and my love for you will last as long as I live. I can see no lightness, no humour, no joke to make. I just hope that we will be able to go back to when we had laughter, and the world was coloured, not black and white and grey. I am so sorry for hurting you. I could inflict all kinds of pain on myself, but it would not take back any I gave to you. – David Power”― Maeve Binchy, Echoes

“I don’t have ugly ducklings turning into swans in my stories. I have ugly ducklings turning into confident ducks.”

“We’re nothing if we’re not loved. When you meet somebody who is more important to you than yourself, that has to be the most important thing in life, really. And I think we are all striving for it in different ways. I also believe very, very strongly that everybody is the hero/heroine of his/her own life. I try to make my characters kind of ordinary, somebody that anybody could be. Because we’ve all had loves, perhaps love and loss, people can relate to my characters”

“Any one could write a book,” said the taxi driver. ” Yes, they could, but they DON’T,” said Maeve Binchy”

“But an intelligent man like you would know that to live in an unrealistic hope is a very foolish way to spend a life.” – Lena Gray”― Maeve Binchy, The Glass Lake

“It was so silly to try to define things by words. What did one person mean by infatuation or obsession and another mean by love. The whole thing couldn’t be tidied away with neat little labels.” – Lena Gray”― Maeve Binchy, The Glass Lake

“She put her head down on the table and cried all the tears that she knew she should have cried in the past year and a half. But they weren’t ready then, they were now.”― Maeve Binchy, Tara Road

“I look placid, you see, that’s why people think I’m fine. Inside I worry a lot.”― Maeve Binchy, Tara Road

“If you had your time all over again…? She was keen to know. You can’t rewrite history. I have no idea what I’d do.”― Maeve Binchy, Tara Road

“Listen to me, Ria. It will be different when you and I have a home. It will be a real home, one that people will want to come running back to.”― Maeve Binchy, Tara Road

“Wasn’t it hard that you did so much for children and loved them so deeply and they seemed so indifferent to you in return?”― Maeve Binchy, Chestnut Street

“A silly idea about a book of blessings couldn’t really work. Not seriously.”― Maeve Binchy, Chestnut Street

“It was true what they had been saying: if people remember you, then you’re not dead. It was very comforting.”

“Writing is a bit like going on a diet; you should either tell everyone or no one.”― Maeve Binchy, The Maeve Binchy Writers’ Club

“She said that it was dangerous to try to know somebody too well. People should have their own reserves, she said, the places they went in their minds, where no one else should follow.”

“How will I explain it all … to everybody?” “You know, people don’t have to explain things nearly as much as you think they do.”― Maeve Binchy, A Week in Winter

Maeve Binchy Snell (28 May 1939– 30 July 2012), known as Maeve Binchy, was an Irish novelist, playwright, short story writer, columnist, and speaker best known for her sympathetic and often humorous portrayal of small-town life in Ireland, her descriptive characters, her interest in human nature, and her often clever surprise endings. Her novels, which were translated into 37 languages, sold more than 40 million copies worldwide, and her death at age 73, announced by Vincent Browne on Irish television late on 30 July 2012, was mourned as the death of Ireland’s best-loved and most recognizable writer. She cracked the US market, featuring on The New York Times best-seller list and in Oprah’s Book Club. Recognized for her “total absence of malice”and generosity to other writers, she finished 3rd in a 2000 poll for World Book Day, ahead of Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Stephen King. (Excerpts From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

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