Category Archives: women writers

not the weaker sex/gender

charityI feel compelled to say something about the cliché and stereo-typing some people or media use about gender differences. It is wrong and deceptive to keep using the “cliché” that woman belongs to a weaker sex/gender and should be treated likewise. In certain nation the society/community tries to use law to confine woman to the weaker and thus vulnerable social economic political category. I personally do not think that will help to protect woman and children or the aged. Based on my experience from study, travel and observation including interviews, I have found strength in woman that a society obsessed with past tradition and prejudices will not find. It is a real tragedy for one half of mankind to be overlooked this way.
Will woman be protected by a law that emphasizes her weak/vulnerable physical characteristics? An honest study of the nations of the world and you will discover that the answer s a definite NO.
On the other hand nations or societies that emphasize woman’s strength and ability to contribute actually benefit from this positive and realistic outlook and attitude. By now the world is fully aware that brawn and physical force do not rule the world. Brain and religious/spiritual belief do. Woman excels in the latter fields.
Our focus to make the world or our nation a better and safer place for our children and the elderly citizens should not be focused on merely making physical law to restrain as evil can only be restrained and removed when we raise a new generation of socially-responsible, pro-team-building, good-neighborly, non-violent, patient, kind, gentle, nurturing, self-less, and honest people with integrity who are willing and capable to work hard for themselves and for others. Woman by nature has these intrinsic values and can qualify and contribute to this positive nation-building effort tremendously.
Coercive control can only breed discord and hatred. On the subject of focusing on the supposedly risk of man dressed up as woman and infiltrates the toilets to do harm to woman, if you insist on using the Law, to be physically effective you need to post woman armed guards at every public toilet. You need to arm the air-hostesses to guard the airplane toilets. You need to arm all the girls in the co-ed schools. You need to give all the female population training on how to use a gun. You need to give lessons for the physically weaker boys too as they too may become victims. You need to train the older people too, the less advantaged people who are more vulnerable to mugging and violence too, the people of colors that are more subject to being victimized too…the list of the world is endless for the vulnerable.
Conditioning is a powerful weapon. Brain washing has been effectively used by many evil totalitarian regimes until the victims are exposed to another conditioning.
I have no answer to the sorry state of the world.
My personal conviction is to start by positive teaching and good-conditioning of our younger ones on the principles and values set by Jesus. Love does not demand its own way.

1 Corinthians 13 New King James Version (NKJV)
The Greatest Gift
13 Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I have become sounding brass or a clanging cymbal. 2 And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned,[a] but have not love, it profits me nothing.

4 Love suffers long and is kind; love does not envy; love does not parade itself, is not puffed up; 5 does not behave rudely, does not seek its own, is not provoked, thinks no evil; 6 does not rejoice in iniquity, but rejoices in the truth; 7 bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

8 Love never fails. But whether there are prophecies, they will fail; whether there are tongues, they will cease; whether there is knowledge, it will vanish away. 9 For we know in part and we prophesy in part. 10 But when that which is perfect has come, then that which is in part will be done away.

11 When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things. 12 For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part, but then I shall know just as I also am known.

13 And now abide faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love.

Footnotes:

1 Corinthians 13:3 NU-Text reads so I may boast.

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woman’s half is beautiful

fifty percent

fifty percent

Why I name this blog fifty percent? From a man’s perspective it means the male population. From a woman’s perspective it means the female population. Similarly, the husband views his half s important, whereas the wife focuses on her half of the marriage relationship. Perhaps it’s not exactly equal half for each to hold. Nonetheless none can claim wholeness without the other in any relationship. Jesus said the two shall become one. A top-heavy situation cannot last. It topples. Likewise, I consider that a healthy, practical, sustainable intimate relationship between two persons only manifests where there is true equality. This means mutual acceptance and respect in words and in deeds. This calls for an acknowledgement of the validity of the other fifty percent and giving her/him an equal value in the equilibrium of life together. This blog aims to take the perspective of the often neglected and demoted fifty percent. Giving the many voiceless a voice. A rightful positioning as God has given to each of His children. Hence, this blog is named “A woman-the Fifty Percent’s Perspective“. I believe this the Creator’s original design for the human race.

Galatians 3:27-29 New King James Version (NKJV)

27 For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. 28 There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. 29 And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.

“You are much, much more.” she wrote

maeve-binchy_grandeI decided to post some quotes of a much loved Irish writer of stories. She wrote of simple ordinary everyday people, but their stories are credible and real. Of love and deceit, family drama, wealth and poverty, of friendship and courage. Families and people who aren’t always quite what they seem.

Maeve Binchy Quotes

“I’ll understand if you don’t want me. But I will be heartbroken. You are all I ever dreamed of and hoped for. You are much, much more. Please know that I didn’t think I was mean-minded. But I realize I am. I don’t want you to put your arms around me and say it’s all right, that you forgive me. I want you to be sure that you do, and my love for you will last as long as I live. I can see no lightness, no humour, no joke to make. I just hope that we will be able to go back to when we had laughter, and the world was coloured, not black and white and grey. I am so sorry for hurting you. I could inflict all kinds of pain on myself, but it would not take back any I gave to you. – David Power”― Maeve Binchy, Echoes

“I don’t have ugly ducklings turning into swans in my stories. I have ugly ducklings turning into confident ducks.”

“We’re nothing if we’re not loved. When you meet somebody who is more important to you than yourself, that has to be the most important thing in life, really. And I think we are all striving for it in different ways. I also believe very, very strongly that everybody is the hero/heroine of his/her own life. I try to make my characters kind of ordinary, somebody that anybody could be. Because we’ve all had loves, perhaps love and loss, people can relate to my characters”

“Any one could write a book,” said the taxi driver. ” Yes, they could, but they DON’T,” said Maeve Binchy”

“But an intelligent man like you would know that to live in an unrealistic hope is a very foolish way to spend a life.” – Lena Gray”― Maeve Binchy, The Glass Lake

“It was so silly to try to define things by words. What did one person mean by infatuation or obsession and another mean by love. The whole thing couldn’t be tidied away with neat little labels.” – Lena Gray”― Maeve Binchy, The Glass Lake

“She put her head down on the table and cried all the tears that she knew she should have cried in the past year and a half. But they weren’t ready then, they were now.”― Maeve Binchy, Tara Road

“I look placid, you see, that’s why people think I’m fine. Inside I worry a lot.”― Maeve Binchy, Tara Road

“If you had your time all over again…? She was keen to know. You can’t rewrite history. I have no idea what I’d do.”― Maeve Binchy, Tara Road

“Listen to me, Ria. It will be different when you and I have a home. It will be a real home, one that people will want to come running back to.”― Maeve Binchy, Tara Road

“Wasn’t it hard that you did so much for children and loved them so deeply and they seemed so indifferent to you in return?”― Maeve Binchy, Chestnut Street

“A silly idea about a book of blessings couldn’t really work. Not seriously.”― Maeve Binchy, Chestnut Street

“It was true what they had been saying: if people remember you, then you’re not dead. It was very comforting.”

“Writing is a bit like going on a diet; you should either tell everyone or no one.”― Maeve Binchy, The Maeve Binchy Writers’ Club

“She said that it was dangerous to try to know somebody too well. People should have their own reserves, she said, the places they went in their minds, where no one else should follow.”

“How will I explain it all … to everybody?” “You know, people don’t have to explain things nearly as much as you think they do.”― Maeve Binchy, A Week in Winter

Maeve Binchy Snell (28 May 1939– 30 July 2012), known as Maeve Binchy, was an Irish novelist, playwright, short story writer, columnist, and speaker best known for her sympathetic and often humorous portrayal of small-town life in Ireland, her descriptive characters, her interest in human nature, and her often clever surprise endings. Her novels, which were translated into 37 languages, sold more than 40 million copies worldwide, and her death at age 73, announced by Vincent Browne on Irish television late on 30 July 2012, was mourned as the death of Ireland’s best-loved and most recognizable writer. She cracked the US market, featuring on The New York Times best-seller list and in Oprah’s Book Club. Recognized for her “total absence of malice”and generosity to other writers, she finished 3rd in a 2000 poll for World Book Day, ahead of Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Stephen King. (Excerpts From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

random quotes of women on writing

cynthia-ozick“On a gray afternoon I sit in a silent room and contemplate din. In the street a single car passes – a rapid bass vowel – and then it is quiet again. So what is this uproar, this hubbub, this heaving rumble of zigzag static I keep hearing? This echo chamber spooling out spirals of chaos? An unmistakable noise as clearly mine as fingerprint or twist of DNA: the thrum of regret, of memory, of defeat, of mutability, of bitter fear, made up of shame and ambition and anger and vanity and wishing. The soundtrack of a movie of the future, an anticipatory ribbon of scenes long dreaded, of daydreams without a prayer of materializing. Or else: the replay of unforgotten conversations, humiliating, awkward, indelible. Mainly it is the buzz of the inescapably mundane, the little daily voice that insists and insists: right now, not now, too late, too soon, why not, better not, turn it on, turn it off, notice this, notice that, be sure to take care of, remember not to. The nonstop chatter that gossips, worries, envies, invokes, yearns, condemns, self-condemns.”
Cynthia Ozick, The Din in the Head

“A story is not like a road to follow … it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you.”
Alice Munro, Selected Stories, 1968-1994

“A man once asked me … how I managed in my books to write such natural conversation between men when they were by themselves. Was I, by any chance, a member of a large, mixed family with a lot of male friends? I replied that, on the contrary, I was an only child and had practically never seen or spoken to any men of my own age till I was about twenty-five. “Well,” said the man, “I shouldn’t have expected a woman (meaning me) to have been able to make it so convincing.” I replied that I had coped with this difficult problem by making my men talk, as far as possible, like ordinary human beings. This aspect of the matter seemed to surprise the other speaker; he said no more, but took it away to chew it over. One of these days it may quite likely occur to him that women, as well as men, when left to themselves, talk very much like human beings also.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

“If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”
Toni Morrison

“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.”
Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

“I can shake off everything as I write; my sorrows disappear, my courage is reborn.”
Anne Frank

“There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they’ll take you.”
Beatrix Potter

“Women want love to be a novel. Men, a short story.”
Daphne du Maurier

“The role of a writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say.”
Anaïs Nin

“The reason that fiction is more interesting than any other form of literature, to those who really like to study people, is that in fiction the author can really tell the truth without humiliating himself.”
Eleanor Roosevelt

“I hate writing, I love having written.”
Dorothy Parker

“Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor, the enemy of the people. It will keep you cramped and insane your whole life, and it is the main obstacle between you and a shitty first draft. I think perfectionism is based on the obsessive belief that if you run carefully enough, hitting each stepping-stone just right, you won’t have to die. The truth is that you will die anyway and that a lot of people who aren’t even looking at their feet are going to do a whole lot better than you, and have a lot more fun while they’re doing it.”
Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

“The only way you can write the truth is to assume that what you set down will never be read. Not by any other person, and not even by yourself at some later date. Otherwise you begin excusing yourself. You must see the writing as emerging like a long scroll of ink from the index finger of your right hand; you must see your left hand erasing it.”
Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin

“A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.”
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

“I’ve got the key to my castle in the air, but whether I can unlock the door remains to be seen.”
Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

“You can fix anything but a blank page.”
Nora Roberts

“Deliver me from writers who say the way they live doesn’t matter. I’m not sure a bad person can write a good book. If art doesn’t make us better, then what on earth is it for.”
Alice Walker

“The best time for planning a book is while you’re doing the dishes. ”
Agatha Christie

“Writing is a job, a talent, but it’s also the place to go in your head. It is the imaginary friend you drink your tea with in the afternoon.”
Ann Patchett, Truth and Beauty

“I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I see and what it means. What I want and what I fear.”
Joan Didion

“Write what disturbs you, what you fear, what you have not been willing to speak about. Be willing to be split open.”
Natalie Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer

“Writing is like getting married. One should never commit oneself until one is amazed at one’s luck.”
Iris Murdoch

“Read a thousand books, and your words will flow like a river.”
Lisa See, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

“Indeed, learning to write may be part of learning to read. For all I know, writing comes out of a superior devotion to reading.”
Eudora Welty, On Writing

“A writer, I think, is someone who pays attention to the world.”

[Speech upon being awarded the Friedenspreis des Deutschen Buchhandels (Peace Prize of the German Book Trade), Frankfurt Book Fair, October 12, 2003]”
Susan Sontag

a writer’s portrait (with quotes)

woman writing in gardenengrossed in her world

she records her time in ink

composing a view

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“When I say work I only mean writing. Everything else is just odd jobs.”
—Margaret Laurence
“If a nation loses its storytellers, it loses its childhood.”
—Peter Handke
“A book is simply the container of an idea—like a bottle; what is inside the book is what matters.”
—Angela Carter
“The greatest part of a writer’s time is spent in reading, in order to write; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.”
—Samuel Bill Johnson
“Write. Rewrite. When not writing or rewriting, read. I know of no shortcuts.” —Larry L. King, WD
“The first sentence can’t be written until the final sentence is written.”
—Joyce Carol Oates, WD
“Anyone who is going to be a writer knows enough at 15 to write several novels.”
—May Sarton
“When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people, not characters. A character is a caricature.”
—Ernest Hemingway
“Don’t expect the puppets of your mind to become the people of your story. If they are not realities in your own mind, there is no mysterious alchemy in ink and paper that will turn wooden figures into flesh and blood.”
—Leslie Gordon Barnard, WD
“Writers live twice.”
—Natalie Goldberg