daughter of God · poetry · thoughts · why not woman · woman writers · women · writing

So, let our lives Be full of dreams

bingxinA few poems quoted at random from Spring Water (published 1923) by Bingxin (Chinese: “Pure in Heart”), a woman poet from China.

Spring Water

1

Water in spring,

It is another year,

And you are still running after the breeze.

May I have a look at

My reflection again?

Water replies gently with thanks:

“My friend,

I have never kept a reflection,

Not even yours.”

2

The four seasons slowly pass by-

Hundreds of flowers whisper to each other:

“We are the small and weak!

So, let our lives

Be full of dreams

And our drinking cups

Sentimental,

For God has already arranged all these!”

3

Young People!

You should be

As still and sober as mountains, if

You can’t float with winds,

The flowing wind-like career

Only belongs to the lives of poets.

6

Poets!

Do not grieve nature.

The picture of “beauty”

Needs to be painted lightly.

52

In the slightly tiring

Deep thought,

The pigeon whistles

Carried on the wind,

Pierce the air for poems.

58

Ice is as quiet as a mountain,

But a mountain is as vivid as flowing water.

How can the poet

Manipulate them like this?

~~~~~~~~

Biography of Bing Xin (1900 – 1999)

Bing Xin was one of the most outstanding modern female writers in China. Originally named Xie Wanying; born in Changle, Fujian Province. Bing Xin was the pioneer of the canon of children’s literature in modern China. Her parents encouraged her to study and write. In 1919, when she was studying in a girl college in Beijing, the event May 4th Movement by the students in Beijing changed her life. and she was in charge of the publicity in the student union. She wrote many related poems, articles, and stories.

In 1919, she published her first piece Two Families under the pen name “Bing Xin”. In 1921, she joined the Literary Research Society. In 1923, she amazed the literary circle with her short poems when they were published in two separate collections, Myriad Stars and Spring Water. In the same year, She went to America to study literature and focused her attention on literary research. She recounted her travels and experiences of her stay abroad in a series of essays, and published them in newspapers in China. These essays caused a national sensation and were later collected and published under the title of Letters to My Little Readers.

In 1926, Bing returned to China after receiving her M.A. degree. She taught at Yanjing University, later at Tsinghua University, and Beijing Women’s College of Arts and Sciences. In 1946, she went to Japan with her husband Wu Wenzao and taught at Tokyo University. She went back to China in 1951. Upon her return, she published a collection of poems, Ode to Cherry Blossoms, and a collection of essays, The Second Batch of Letters to My Little Readers. Apart from writing, Bing Xin also translated a number of foreign literary works. With the reputation “the grandmother of the literary circle” earned through her longevity, she passed away in 1999 at the age of 99.

Love Life

Her love story with Wu Wenzao, a famous sociologist and ethnologist, started in 1923 on a ship that sailed from Shanghai. The ship was bound for the United States, and Bing met Wu when she was searching for the brother of one of her classmates.

In 1929, the two got married while studying in the United States. Together, they became an internationally well-known couple in intellectual circles all over the world, mingling with other literary luminaries such as Virginia Woolf.

Their story was one of those love stories that have captured the hearts and imaginations of the Chinese public for decades. Many of them have been adapted for the big screen as well as for television. In a world where buildings fall, relationships end and economies collapse almost overnight, their tales remind us of the endurance of real love.

(the above are quoted and excerpted from various internet sources)

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