best thoughts · flowers pictures · God's creation · photography · woman of faith · woman story

an evanescent rose: random perspective

evanescent roseAn Evanescent  rose. I took this picture in late November 2015 at Santa Cruz, CA. I have a soft spot for roses. Is it because of their beauty despite the thorns? Or should I rephrase my question to, is it because of their beauty in having the thorns? I believe there are two perspectives. One can view the thorns as encumbrances. Another may view the thorns as added advantages. I like to think that the thorns of a rose demonstrate the strength of an otherwise seemingly fragile looking flower. I do not like to liken a rose to a woman or vice versa. But if anyone ever thinks of a woman as a rose, please also think of the thorns, that is, the inherent strength of a woman. No, women are not the weaker ones.

art picture · best thoughts · God's creation · God's love · travel · woman story

a decorative path of love

path-decorative-caThe 16th Avenue Tiled Steps project has been a neighborhood effort to create a beautiful mosaic running up the risers of the 163 steps located at 16th and Moraga in San Francisco. The residents had been working on this project since January of 2003. It was inspired by the famous stairs in Rio De Janero, these steps were meticulously created over a summer to build a beautiful walkway for the whole city to enjoy. Artists Aileen Barr and Colette Crutcher led the creation of the 163 mosaic panels that were applied to the step risers, over 300 neighbors joined us in making them, and over 220 neighbors sponsored handmade animal, bird and fish name tiles imbedded within the mosaic.

To get to the Mosaic Steps you would take the bus from Golden Gate Park (about 15 minutes away) and then get off around 16th avenue. Approaching from 16th avenue you can immediately see the Mosaic Steps as they ascend to Grand View Park. After walking up the two blocks of steep streets (like everything in San Francisco) you will reach the base of the steps.

Are steps up the slope considered a Path ?

Enjoy climbing the decorative path, which may be viewed as a labor of love from a group of neighborly people. Their labor is not in vain.

Luke 10:29 But he, wanting to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”
Luke 10:36 So which of these three do you think was neighbor to him who fell among the thieves?”

Matthew 22:37-40 New King James Version (NKJV)
37 Jesus said to him, “‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ 38 This is the first and great commandment. 39 And the second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ 40 On these two commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets.”

God's creation · photography · thoughts · travel

a reflected tree in a tropical aquarium

Weekly photos challenge Mirror
reflected tree n skyThis picture was taken in December 2014 at a tropical aquarium. It was a day trip with a young and energetic enthusiast for fish and marine lives. It was a clear day and this pond was outside the aquarium. The reflection mirrored the trees and the sky above quite well despite the shallow pond. what I like is the way the reflection blends with the fish and the rocky floor beneath the water. The picture becomes somewhat like a painting not by man’s hands.

p/s: I have recently been told that the aquarium will be closed and the creatures relocated to somewhere else if any. A sad story. It does reflect the real life and its uncertainty, even to the fishes.

God's creation · mental health · thoughts · woman story · writing

a fifty percent attempt

Fiftyfifty percent speaks “Fifty” is a 2015 Nigerian romantic drama film released on December 18, 2015. Fifty captures few pivotal days of four women at the pinnacle of their careers. “FIFTY – The Movie” in New Zealand follows Mal Law’s bold attempt to run 50 mountain marathons over 50 peaks in just 50 days, all around New Zealand, in order to raise an enormous amount of money for the Mental Health Foundation. “FIFTY – The Movie will inspire the armchair athlete in all of us to think outside the box, push boundaries and think what if?” (I searched the internet and found these two movies with the name, “fifty”. I have not watched them. They sound interesting just by looking at the title.)

Coming back to my own fifty interpretation. This blog was first started on 2013/9/30. On 2016/4/30 I renamed this blog. In naming this blog fifty percent perspective I tried to focus the goal of this writing on giving voice to the less heard fifty percent of the human race, i.e. the woman. I consider that a healthy, practical, sustainable intimate relationship between a man and a woman only manifests where there is true equality. This means mutual acceptance and respect in words and in deeds. This calls for an acknowledgement of the validity of the other fifty percent and giving her/him an equal value in the equilibrium of life together. In particular, I place an importance on the right and manifestation of right to speak/communicate. I admit that in some situations it is the man who becomes the less heard fifty percent. So my goal is not confined to voicing for a woman. If a man considers himself a fifty percent which is not being given a voice he may be included in this blog’s fifty percent perspective too. To me, being human means being given the right to speak and the voice to be heard.
(https://kingdomofgodaughter.wordpress.com/2016/04/30/fifty-percent/)

biography · Chrisitan woman · thoughts · woman of faith · women

it was a woman physicist who discovered the power of nuclear energy

Lisa-Meitner“Racial and gender prejudice are dramatic backdrops to our modern era. The dramatic splitting of the atom—“nuclear fission”—was a discovery which changed our world. Yet few know that it was a woman physicist who discovered the power of nuclear energy just after her dramatic escape from Nazi Germany. The irony of the story of Lise Meitner (1878 – 1968) is that her laboratory partner of thirty years, Otto Hahn, who remained in Berlin throughout the Third Reich, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1944. Meitner’s exclusion from sharing the Nobel Prize was thus integrally related to her escape from Nazi Germany to Sweden and the consequent social ‘marginalization’ of her important physics research and discoveries. Albert Einstein called the respected Viennese pioneer in nuclear physics “our Madame Curie.” (Above quoted from http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/meitner-lise)

The brilliant Lise Meitner was the mother of nuclear power, but you’ve probably never heard of her! Her research contributed greatly to the discovery of nuclear fission. She was an Austrian physicist who worked on radioactivity and nuclear physics. Otto Hahn and Meitner led the small group of scientists who first discovered nuclear fission of uranium when it absorbed an extra neutron; the results were published in early 1939.

Lise Meitner was one of eight children. When she finished school at age 14, she was barred from higher education, as were all girls in Austria. When Lise showed an early propensity for mathematics, she was privately tutored, her father insisting that each of his daughters receive the same education as his sons. (Three of Lise’s sisters later also earned their Ph.D. degrees). Inspired by the discoveries of William Röntgen and Henri Becquerel, she was determined to study radioactivity. When she turned 21, women were finally allowed into Austrian universities. Two years of tutoring preceded her enrollment at the University of Vienna; there she excelled in math and physics and earned her doctorate in 1906. She wrote to Marie Curie, but there was no room for her in the Paris lab and so Meitner made her way to Berlin. There she collaborated with Otto Hahn on the study of radioactive elements, but as an Austrian Jewish woman (all three qualities were strikes against her), she was excluded from the main labs and lectures and allowed to work only in the basement. For several years she was not permitted access to the laboratories of the Berlin Institute for Chemistry where she worked as an unpaid research scientist (1907–1912)

In 1912, Hahn and Meitner moved to a new university and Meitner had better lab facilities. Meitner became an official University Lecturer in 1922, but even in liberalizing Berlin the press jokingly reported the topic of her inaugural speech as “Cosmetic Physics” instead of cosmic physics. She led several courses in quantum physics with her outstanding graduate students (such as Leo Szilard and Max Delbrueck) as assistants, until Adolf Hitler’s decrees in April, 1933 stripped Jewish academics of their professorial positions.

At first she was an unpaid “guest” under Hahn, but most people knew they were equals in their research team. From 1924 to 1934, the team gained international prestige and were nominated for the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for ten consecutive years. Though their partnership was split up physically when she was forced to flee Nazi Germany in 1938, Hahn and Meitner continued to collaborate.

Meitner continued her work in Sweden. After Hahn discovered that uranium atoms were split when bombarded with neutrons, Meitner and her nephew Frisch took a hike in the snowy Swedish woods, animatedly discussing the puzzling “bursting” process. Then they realized: if E=mc2, that mass could not be lost, but the nucleus would be “split in two.”. She calculated the energy released in the reaction and named the phenomenon “nuclear fission.” The discovery—which eventually led to the atomic bomb (“You must not blame scientists for the use to which war technicians have put our discoveries,” Meitner would say in 1945)—won Hahn the Nobel Prize in 1944. Meitner was left out by the Awarding Committee.

She carried on with her research and helped produce one of the first peacetime nuclear reactors. It wasn’t until 1966 that Meitner really received any attention. During her 60 years of work in the field of atomic physics she wrote 128 articles, and served on the United Nations Committee on atomic energy. In 1992 it was announced that she would have an element named after her, meitnerium. Meitner spent most of her 70s and 80s traveling, encouraging women students to “remember that science can bring both joy and satisfaction to your life.”

Lise’s parents were assimilated Viennese Jews, who did not practice Judaism. In 1908 on a visit to Vienna Lise formally withdrew from the Jewish community and was baptized at the Evangelical Congregation.

(The above biography is compiled from information/excerpts from Wikipedia and Jewish Women encyclopedia)

Reading the above makes me marvel at the courage and determination of this woman whose ability and worth as an individual overcame the male chauvinistic social and economic culture and racial prejudices of her time. She was a woman and a Jew. These went against her in that time. She was made to work and research without pay and under harsh physical condition. She was not given a recognition which she rightly deserved. She was threatened with her life. But all these did not stop her from becoming a woman of great worth, perhaps not in monetary terms, but in the history of mankind. She will not be forgotten. She became a model of overcomer.