mental health, women

Sociopath: She will lie about almost everything

a portraitIt’s common to wonder what causes someone to be a sociopath as we watch in disbelief as the sociopath lies, manipulates, harms, and feels no empathy for anyone. Trying to teach empathy and emotion to a sociopath is like trying to teach a cellphone to cook a pizza. If it sounds ridiculous to teach a phone to cook a pizza, it’s because it is. A phone isn’t wired to cook, and it’s not bothered by this fact. Likewise, a sociopath’s brain isn’t wired to feel empathy or other emotions, and like the phone, the sociopath isn’t bothered about it.

Quoted from an answer in Quora about dating a sociopath: She will lie about almost everything, and if you ever call her out on it, she will deny it vehemently…to the point where you start to question yourself and your own memory.
She will create a LOT of drama. She will lie, cheat, steal, and harm people with no remorse. She will expect you to clean up her messes, and support her in her bad behavior. She’ll ask you money for rent/groceries/bills/whatever, and then spend it on new shoes or clothes.

Nothing is ever her fault. She blames others (and especially you) for all of her problems. It’s the worst relationship you could ever imagine.

It’s a nightmare, so exhausting that her cheating on you (even when you find out) is, like, the least of your worries. You won’t remember ever caring as much about the infidelity part as much as cleaning up her messes.
(Above quoted from: https://www.quora.com/How-does-it-feel-to-date-a-female-sociopath-What-are-the-signs-and-their-specific-traits)

Introduction about a sociopath condition (Quoted/partially excerpted from: http://www.softpanorama.org/Social/Toxic_managers/female_sociopaths.shtml

Female sociopaths are in their own class-they are much more manipulative than male psychopaths. We will distinguish the term “sociopath” and “psychopath” based on physical violence: psychopath is sociopath who routinely or even predominantly uses physical violence. Often they are criminals.

Female sociopaths rarely use physical violence and can much better mask their real intentions than man psychopaths-they are more patient (although the term patience and sociopath are mutually contradictory — they are after instant gratification) and can hunt for a prey somewhat longer. And probably are more dangerous when you have them close by. As a rule female sociopaths are much more vicious and vindictive than man sociopaths.

Typically, they are somewhat sadistic, especially toward women– which means that they experience pleasure from suffering of their victims. Like all sociopaths they are natural born, talented actors and have the astonishing ability to tell bare-faced lies and remain calm, utterly shameless if caught. This is the case with psychopaths in general, but with female sociopaths you really see the master class of this art. Ruthless and conniving. Can extort favors using fake pregnancies, injuries to themselves, threats to kill themselves, etc. They are really like a person, who killed her/his parents, and then asks for lesser sentence because she is now an orphan. While they are adept in masking their real mean and cruel personality some signs and discrepancies in their acting are often visible. The problem is that due to their charm the victim typically fails to pay any attention to them.

A lot of tragedies could be avoided if people who are facing something strange or inconsistent in behavior simply take the time to ask, “What else could this mean?” “Can it be explained as an attempt of manipulation, or bold faced lie?”

Add to that compulsive desire of winning at all cost (they are about power; such a natural born power addicts) and see other people just of tools for achieving her goals.

They roll over their victims like steamroller and feel nothing. The last sentence is impossible to understand by just reading this page, You need to see couple of movies depicting such a character and first of all Dangerous Liaisons In this film Glenn Close (she also presents similar, but more close to the borderline personality character in Fatal Attraction ) created an unforgettable character of a female sociopath. It is all about domination and power. There is no emotional attachment to anybody. Everybody is just a tool. They have no boundaries and are ready to go to the bitter end to achieve their goal.

They typically have high IQ which makes them even more dangerous if they are a member of your family or girlfriend. And they are really lethal weapon as managers. Demanding, ruthless, two-faced, manipulative, relentless and very methodical bullies. And typically they are more sophisticated. Even the murder cases involving female sociopaths are typically more complex, more devious and less direct, for example the “black widow” marries a wealthy old man and puts poison in his drink. Money are often a strong motivating factor.

To detect a female sociopath for the outsider is a very challenging task as they are masters of mimicry — natural born great artists. They usually produce a very good, positive first impression. They excel in interviews. They do not allow themselves to show their anger for people on the same level, or above them. Anger is reserved to subordinates and members of the immediate family. Despite inability to feels love, they can imitate it and they are often seductive. Love for them, like for an escort, it’s not about reality, but about creating the illusion of reality. Like in everything, here the devil is details, but people in romantic mode and under influence of psychopathic charm are rarely able to see them, until too late. The same is actually true for upper management in the corporate environment: often they do not suspect whom they are dealing with…

But for subordinates the situation is different, they are tools that do not deserve to be treated as human beings. Make no mistakes here. You will immediately:
Feel that you have been treated unfairly
Feel that you have no control over things you previously controlled.
Feel that you are under a lot of pressure. Typically with bursts of anger directly hitting at you.

(You may visit this website to read the complete article: http://www.softpanorama.org/Social/Toxic_managers/female_sociopaths.shtml)

An excerpt on what happens in the mind of the sociopath:
“Ultimately, the sociopath typically emotionally destroys those who are close to him or her, but the sociopath destroys them in a way consistent with their unique approach to others: They take them out like your average person kills off characters in a video game. Those in the wake of the sociopath suffer because they have the liability sociopaths don’t: actual human feelings that stem from a deep sense of social obligations to others, a moral anchor that is supposed to be part and parcel of having relationships.
“The sense of entitlement that comes with sociopathy is astonishing to those who abide by the social laws and conventions of our culture. Where does the entitlement come from? It stems from an underlying sense of rage. Sociopaths feel deeply angry and resentful underneath their often-charming exterior, and this rage fuels their sense that they have the right to act out in whichever way they happen to choose at the time. Everything is up for grabs with sociopaths and nothing is off limits.” “Are they born this way?” is one of the most frequently asked questions. The truth is that we don’t know. (https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/insight-is-2020/201304/understanding-the-sociopath-cause-motivation-relationship)

Quote from Mayo Clinical staff: (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/antisocial-personality-disorder/symptoms-causes/dxc-20198978?p=1)
Symptoms
Antisocial personality disorder signs and symptoms may include:
• Disregard for right and wrong
• Persistent lying or deceit to exploit others
• Being callous, cynical and disrespectful of others
• Using charm or wit to manipulate others for personal gain or personal pleasure
• Arrogance, a sense of superiority and being extremely opinionated
• Recurring problems with the law, including criminal behavior
• Repeatedly violating the rights of others through intimidation and dishonesty
• Impulsiveness or failure to plan ahead
• Hostility, significant irritability, agitation, aggression or violence
• Lack of empathy for others and lack of remorse about harming others
• Unnecessary risk-taking or dangerous behavior with no regard for the safety of self or others
• Poor or abusive relationships
• Failure to consider the negative consequences of behavior or learn from them
• Being consistently irresponsible and repeatedly failing to fulfill work or financial obligations
Adults with antisocial personality disorder typically show symptoms of conduct disorder before the age of 15. Signs and symptoms of conduct disorder include serious, persistent behavior problems, such as:
• Aggression toward people and animals
• Destruction of property
• Deceitfulness
• Theft
• Serious violation of rules

WHAT TO DO WITH A SOCIOPATH?
Confronting the problem head-on. Coming to understand the nature and scope of sociopathy, acknowledging that it’s complex group of traits and behaviors that function together, and dealing with the whole rather than with little parts of it is a helpful start. Changing one aspect of a sociopath, such as trying to help her stop lying, does nothing to change the nature of a sociopath.
Adopting a systemic approach. Sociopath treatment has a better chance of working if it’s done in every system in which the sociopath functions (relationships, work, activities, etc.). Evidence shows that working with sociopaths in the field is somewhat effective in changing attitudes and behaviors. Unfortunately, evidence also shows that after initial improvement, the sociopath regresses back to his old self.
While these treatments may not be effective for adult sociopaths, they may prove helpful to the child sociopath – the child who exhibits sociopathic behaviors.

When Treatment For Sociopaths Fails
The unfortunate reality is that at this point, there is no evidence to show that a sociopath can change. Currently, there is nothing that has been proven effective as a treatment for a sociopath. Researchers and practitioners aren’t giving up, though. Can sociopaths be cured? Experts hope they can.
In the meantime, professionals advise that the best way to deal with a sociopath is to cut off all contact. Doing so may be the best treatment possible, at least for the non-sociopath. (Read more: http://www.healthyplace.com/personality-disorders/sociopath/sociopath-treatment-can-a-sociopath-change/)

Words of Wisdom to meditate on: Proverbs 2 from the Bible (NLT)
12
Wisdom will save you from evil people,
from those whose words are twisted.
13
These men turn from the right way
to walk down dark paths.
14
They take pleasure in doing wrong,
and they enjoy the twisted ways of evil.
15
Their actions are crooked,
and their ways are wrong.

16
Wisdom will save you from the immoral woman,
from the seductive words of the promiscuous woman.
17
She has abandoned her husband
and ignores the covenant she made before God.
18
Entering her house leads to death;
it is the road to the grave.
19
The man who visits her is doomed.
He will never reach the paths of life.

20
So follow the steps of the good,
and stay on the paths of the righteous.
21
For only the godly will live in the land,
and those with integrity will remain in it.
22
But the wicked will be removed from the land,
and the treacherous will be uprooted.

Advertisements
biography, Chrisitan woman, why not woman, woman story

a woman of finance background to watch

andrea Lead.jpg
She is steadfast and confident, honest and reliable.A tower of strength for those she cares for and a rock to the family.
“We have a bright future outside the EU.

In total 170 countries in the world are outside the EU. Most of them have sensible trading arrangements, including with Europe, and workable immigration policies. This is not some fantasy land. This is the normal operating basis of four-fifths of the globe.
And we are in such a strong position to make the most of the opportunity. We are the fifth largest economy, with great natural advantages including our language, legal system, the great City of London, and our great trading history and creative and engineering talents. Nearly eighty per cent of the world’s GDP lies outside the EU and, in marked contrast to the EU, most of it is growing strongly. We need to embrace that opportunity to ensure our future prosperity.”

Biography
Andrea was born in Buckinghamshire and attended Tonbridge Girls Grammar School in Kent, followed by Warwick University. She holds a degree in Political Science.

After university Andrea began a career in the banking and finance industry that would last 25 years. Andrea’s career included 10 years in BZW and Barclays where she worked in swaps and treasury, project finance, structured projects and then moved to Barclays Head Office to become Financial Institutions Director. In 1995 she helped the then Governor of the Bank of England, Eddie George, over the weekend that Barings collapsed as he tried to reassure the markets and prevent a run on the banks. Andrea more recently held positions as Managing Director of a start up London based funds management company and then spent ten years as Head of Corporate Governance and Senior Investment Officer at Invesco Perpetual, one of the UK’s largest retail fund managers.

Alongside her business career, Andrea was a Trustee, and for 9 years Chairman, of a children’s charity, the Oxford Parent Infant Project (OXPIP), which helps families that are struggling to form a secure bond with their new babies. In 2011, Andrea established the Northamptonshire Parent Infant Partnership (NORPIP), as a sister charity to OXPIP, and in 2012 established PIP UK, a new charitable foundation, whose purpose will be to support the roll out of Parent Infant Partnerships around the country. PIP UK offers practical and financial support for the establishment of new PIPs.

Andrea has wanted to be an MP since she was 13 and has been a Conservative activist since University. She was elected as a Councillor on South Oxfordshire District Council between 2003 and 2007, and contested Knowsley South in the 2005 general election.

In May 2010, Andrea was elected as the first MP for South Northamptonshire with a majority of over 20,000.

Andrea was elected in 2010 to the Treasury Select Committee. She has also held posts as Chairman of the APPG on Sure Starts, and Chairman of the APPG on the 1001 Critical Days – conception to age two; she was founder and co-Chairman with a Labour MP of the APPG for European Reform and founded the Fresh Start Project in Parliament that works towards establishing a new relationship for Britain within the EU.

In April 2014, Andrea joined the Government as Economic Secretary to the Treasury, taking responsibility for Financial Services.

Andrea is married to Ben and has three children and in her free time enjoys cycling, walking in the Northamptonshire countryside and spending time with her family.

Andrea comes from the Latin meaning “Womanly” or “Beautiful Lady”. She is steadfast and confident, honest and reliable.A tower of strength for those she cares for and a rock to the family.
That girl is quite the andrea.
Andrea Leadsom, MP for South Northamptonshire. Wife, Mother. Leave campaigner.
http://www.andrealeadsom.com/home/home

biography, Chrisitan woman, God's love, woman missionary, woman of faith, woman story

“If you just work hard enough, you will get there.”

“If you just work hard enough, you will get there.” Her life was remarkable, characterized by the confidence that she can accomplish whatever is required because of her trust in the Lord.

In the midst of World War II, Margaret studied medicine in London. She topped the class with Paul Brand as second. Despite their brilliant academic performance, both were committed followers of Christ and dedicated their lives to serve God in a third world country. They both pioneered practices in the treatment of leprosy in India and throughout the world. Almost by accident, without formal training in eye diseases, she became an ophthalmologist and one of the foremost authorities in the field of ocular leprosy. You will be encouraged and inspired by the remarkable impact of this medical pioneer in the field of leprosy and by her vision for God. Her work in medicine and rehabilitation has literally touched the lives of millions, and her quiet, humble leanings upon her Lord and Savior has touched perhaps even more lives. Through this unique biography/autobiography, we have, for the first time, a look at the personal life and world-renown work of this great medical pioneer. we see the record of a woman who was firstly a disciple of Jesus Christ, and an example for professional women in combining responsible motherhood of six children with pursuit of an outstanding clinical career. The pace of the storytelling is such that one ends a chapter wondering what is going to happen in the next. Human interest events combine with objective reporting to provide a wealth of quotable insights.
Dr. Paul Wilson Brand, CBE (17 July 1914 – 8 July 2003) was a pioneer in developing tendon transfer techniques for use in the hands of those with leprosy. He was the first physician to appreciate that leprosy did not cause the rotting away of tissues, but that it was the loss of the sensation of pain which made sufferers susceptible to injury. Brand contributed extensively to the fields of hand surgery and hand therapy through his publications and lectures, and wrote popular autobiographical books about his childhood, his parents’ missionary work, and his philosophy about the valuable properties of pain. One of his best known books, co-written with Philip Yancey, is Pain: The Gift Nobody Wants (1993), republished in 1997 as The Gift of Pain. His wife of 61 years of a happy and fulfilling marriage, Dr. Margaret Brand lived until 95 and passed away in 2014.

(The above information is taken from various internet sources: Vision for God: The Story of Dr. Margaret Brand Paperback – September 1, 2006)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Why not women: A Biblical Study of Women in Missions, Ministry, and Leadership
“We did not write this book for the millions of women who are happy and secure in their roles. Our passion was for the hundreds of millions of women who are not free. It was for their sake, and for the final completion of the task of taking the Good News to them, that we wrote this book.”

Multiplied millions of women all over the world are looking over the church’s shoulder, longing to see the freedom Jesus purchased for them at Calvary. Millions more have found freedom in Jesus but are still bound by human ideas-ideas that pressure a woman to let culture, not God, determine her place in the Kingdom.

While hurting men and women are outside the church cry out, “Is there any hope? Does anyone care?” their sisters in the church are asking, “How can I share the hope I have” How can I, a woman, serve the Lord?” Many women, having heard God call them into public roles in the Kingdom, are serving in positions of leadership. They are asking, “Will the church support us?”

We must respond. The issue of women in missions, ministry, and leadership is dividing homes, churches, communities, even societies. We must respond responsibly, for we never want to find ourselves working against God’s purposes, quenching His Spirit at work in the lives of those He has called. We must respond carefully, since God’s truth often stands in direct opposition to what the majority of people believe. The book includes a recommended resource list, Endnotes for each chapter 1-18 with a final word, short author biographies and related book lists.
(quoted from Amazon)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Chrisitan woman, daughter of God, love story, photography, thoughts, woman writers, women, writing

She said,“I like adventures, and I’m going to find some.” (short quotes)

sail my shipLouisa May Alcott quotes

“Preserve your memories, keep them well, what you forget you can never retell.”

“Life is like college; may I graduate and earn some honors.”

“I like adventures, and I’m going to find some.”

“Well, if I can’t be happy, I can be useful, perhaps.”
“I ask not for any crown
But that which all may win;
Nor try to conquer any world
Except the one within.”

“Far away there in the sunshine are my highest aspirations. I may not reach them, but I can look up and see their beauty, believe in them, and try to follow where they lead.”

“A faithful friend is a strong defense;
And he that hath found him hath found a treasure.”

“The power of finding beauty in the humblest things makes home happy and life lovely.”

“I want to do something splendid…
Something heroic or wonderful that won’t be forgotten after I’m dead…
I think I shall write books.”

“Painful as it may be, a significant emotional event can be the catalyst for choosing a direction that serves us – and those around us – more effectively. Look for the learning.”

“Nothing is impossible to a determined woman.”-Behind a Mask: The Unknown Thrillers of Louisa May Alcott

“She is too fond of books, and it has turned her brain.”
―Work: A Story of Experience

“That is a good book it seems to me, which is opened with expectation and closed with profit.”
“Keep good company, read good books, love good things and cultivate soul and body as faithfully as you can”
―Rose in Bloom

“Wild roses are fairest, and nature a better gardener than art.” ― A Long Fatal Love Chase

“The emerging woman … will be strong-minded, strong-hearted, strong-souled, and strong-bodied…strength and beauty must go together.” “A real gentleman is as polite to a little girl as to a woman.” ―An Old-Fashioned Girl

“Simple, genuine goodness is the best capital to found the business of this life upon. It lasts when fame and money fail, and is the only riches we can take out of this world with us.”“Love is a flower that grows in any soil, works its sweet miracles undaunted by autumn frost or winter snow, blooming fair and fragrant all the year, and blessing those who give and those who receive.” ―Little Men

“Love is the only thing that we can carry with us when we go, and it makes the end so easy.”
―Little Women Book Two Book: Good Wives

The following are quotes from Little Women: (See the heart of a writer)

“I like good strong words that mean something…”

“I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship.”

“I’ve got the key to my castle in the air, but whether I can unlock the door remains to be seen.”

“Love Jo all your days, if you choose, but don’t let it spoil you, for it’s wicked to throw away so many good gifts because you can’t have the one you want.”

“I’d rather take coffee than compliments just now.”

“Love is a great beautifier.”

“Because they are mean is no reason why I should be. I hate such things, and though I think I’ve a right to be hurt, I don’t intend to show it. (Amy March)”

“Watch and pray, dear, never get tired of trying, and never think it is impossible to conquer your fault.”

“…for love casts out fear, and gratitude can conquer pride.”

“Let us be elegant or die!”

“Don’t try to make me grow up before my time…”

“Be worthy love, and love will come.”

“I keep turning over new leaves, and spoiling them, as I used to spoil my copybooks; and I make so many beginnings there never will be an end. (Jo March)”

“You don’t need scores of suitors. You need only one… if he’s the right one.”

“You are the gull, Jo, strong and wild, fond of the storm and the wind, flying far out to sea, and happy all alone.”

“…the love, respect, and confidence of my children was the sweetest reward I could receive for my efforts to be the woman I would have them copy.”

“Conceit spoils the finest genius.”

“Some people seemed to get all sunshine, and some all shadow…”

“Every few weeks she would shut herself up in her room, put on her scribbling suit, and fall into a vortex, as she expressed it, writing away at her novel with all her heart and soul, for till that was finished she could find no peace.”

“Be comforted, dear soul! There is always light behind the clouds.”

“I think she is growing up, and so begins to dream dreams, and have hopes and fears and fidgets, without knowing why or being able to explain them.”

“Wouldn’t it be fun if all the castles in the air which we make could come true and we could live in them?”

“I wish I had no heart, it aches so…”

“A quick temper, sharp tongue, and restless spirit were always getting her into scrapes, and her life was a series of ups and downs, which were both comic and pathetic.”

“If we are all alive ten years hence, let’s meet, and see how many of us have got our wishes, or how much nearer we are then than now.”

“I could have been a great many things.”

“life and love are very precious when both are in full bloom.”

“…tomorrow was her birthday, and she was thinking how fast the years went by, how old she was getting, and how little she seemed to have accomplished. Almost twenty-five and nothing to show for it.”

“…and Jo laid the rustling sheets together with a careful hand, as one might shut the covers of a lovely romance, which holds the reader fast till the end comes, and he finds himself alone in the work-a-day world again.”

daughter of God, last days, why do women not want to be women, why not woman

Why do some women not want to be woman? (3) spirit and gender

In my former posts I put forward two matters which affect our thoughts.
1 God’s view of us.
2 our own view of us.
First, I decided that God does not have particular favor for one or another gender or change His views. His image means His image. We were created in God’s image, male and female,  equally important and precious to God. So we can speak further on this God-platform.
Second, I established that our own view can be shaped by the world at large. Many have studied and written on the subject of social-economic-political factors that influence the soul and self worth. I shall not go deeper there.
Today I want to speak of a third perspective: the spiritual view.
This is the least trodden path and few have walked. Why? Because man are conditioned in using more of our five senses. We have been conditioned to live mainly on the five planes. The spiritual plane has been treated with taboo in the modern world,
in the Christian world especially so.
In principle both Christian and non Christian believe the existence of the spiritual reality. In practice many err in not knowing how to live with such a reality which is unseen.
Christians have a guide book given by God on this matter. We only need to be led by the Holy Spirit. He will tell us all things God wants us to know. God is Spirit. Jesus is Spirit at the right hand of God now. Daily we pray and communicate with the trinity God.
The Bible tells us that there are good and bad spirits in the form of angels. The good ones serve God and some are sent by God to minister for those who will inherit salvation.
Jesus spoke on gender issues as follows: (Luke 20:34-36)
“Marriage is for people here on earth. But in the age to come, those worthy of being raised from the dead will neither marry nor be given in marriage. And they will never die again. In this respect they will be like angels. They are children of God and children of the resurrection.”
In my previous post I quoted what Jesus said about God’s children being born again of the Holy Spirit. “That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.” (John 3:6)
Reading the above we can see that in the flesh we are assigned two genders, male and female who can marry and become one. Jesus spoke on this: “Have you not read that He who made them at the beginning made them male and female, and said, ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh’? “So then, they are no longer two but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let not man separate. ” (Matthew 19:4-6)
Summary of above:
We have two parts, flesh (body and soul), and spirit. The flesh part is assigned gender and gender related functionality on earth.
The spirit is born again and communicates with God and one day will be given a new body without gender and return to God.
Again, God does not discriminate against or favor one particular gender. God is Spirit and according to what Jesus said about spirit, has no gender (as defined on earth).
Coming back to the question of why some women do not want to be woman.
I shall give the perspective of a modern educated woman and or one who has been conditioned to put priority on self worth.
When she views herself being threatened or debased in her worth as a woman she might consider giving up being one if given a choice.
This is the same as my conclusion in the previous post.
But today we have touched on another view which the woman has not been exposed to, the spiritual aspect.
———
Conclusion: Being born female or male does not make one less human or valuable in God’s eyes.
What matters is that in the born again spirit there is a new creation status not based on gender division.
Gender is for this earth age. In another age there is a brand new existence like the angels without gender for those who make it there.
The woman or man who knows and believes this  phase of spiritual reality is no longer bound by the way the world thinks. There is no extra merit of being either gender in the spirit.
No discrimination by the human world can devalue either gender.
The spiritual perspective is based on the unchangeable principles of God.
So there is no necessity for a woman to want to give up her femaleness.
In modern developed society women can compete with men in many industries and are doing well socially and economically.
The history of the Christian world recorded many women who gave their lives to serve God in dangerous mission fields just as their men counterparts did.
Jesus said, “Anyone who does the will of My Father in heaven is my brother and sister and mother! ” (Matthew 12:50).
——–
I have not touched on the subject of sexual orientation in this discussion. For those interested, please read these three posts with an open heart. See God’s view and purpose from the beginning to end. It’s recorded. I maintain that knowing and believing in the spiritual reality makes the difference. The Holy Spirit gives us the power to live God’s will.
——-Bible books for us to read and meditate upon:
1 Peter and 2 Peter.
“All flesh is as grass,
And all the glory of man as the flower of the grass.
The grass withers,
And its flower falls away,
But the word of the Lord endures forever.”
( 1 Peter 1:24-25)
image
God is Spirit. He wants us to worship Him in spirit and in truth.

God's creation, woman story, word roadmap

God shows His love for a woman of ‘no reputation’

God had grand purpose for His people and He also had the perfect plan to carry out His purpose. This record of a woman (a harlot) is truly important and relevant to today’s woman. (I recommend that you read the whole chapter two which I will include in this post).

In chapter one we read of how God promised Moses’ capable military assistant Joshua (the new general of the army of Israel) He had given to Joshua and God’s people every place that Joshua’s foot would tread upon. God gave him a powerful weapon: His words. So Joshua was the important and qualified military and God’s word man, whom God had chosen to use. In chapter two, however, an hitherto unknown woman appeared on the scene, to become the ordinary and seemingly unqualified woman, whom God had chosen to use. She was described as a harlot (prostitute).

Briefly, this woman named Rahab hid two spies from the people of Israel and lied to her own king who looked for the spies to capture them. She even helped them to safely leave that city and safely returned to Joshua’s camp. In return she asked that they ensured the safety of her family and herself. Why did she take such a risk? She did not even know them.

Note how she told the spies her knowledge of What God did for them and her decision to show kindness to them in exchange for their kindness to her and family. She heard of their God and she believed that this God is the greatest: “for the Lord your God, He is God in heaven above and on earth beneath. “ Thus she told them. She was no ordinary woman. She heard of God and she got to know Him even from a distance! What a God who had made Himself known to such a humble insignificant (even foreign) woman! What a woman who had decided to  leave her past behind her and put her faith in the God who was  not her people’s god. By faith, she became very strong and courageous too, like Joshua! Note how well versed she was about the military situation. She was even accurate in summing up the current defeatist attitude of her own side (her king and army’s fear of the Israelite army who had God on their side). She made sure she was on God’s side! When Jericho was wiped out, only she and her family escaped death.

God did a further amazing thing with this woman. She became the wife of an Israelite leader Salmon, and the great grandmother of David the king, from whom the human lineage of Jesus derived.

Bible verses: Joshua chapter two___________

Now Joshua the son of Nun sent out two men from Acacia Grove to spy secretly, saying, “Go, view the land, especially Jericho.” So they went, and came to the house of a harlot named Rahab, and lodged there.  And it was told the king of Jericho, saying, “Behold, men have come here tonight from the children of Israel to search out the country.”

So the king of Jericho sent to Rahab, saying, “Bring out the men who have come to you, who have entered your house, for they have come to search out all the country.”

Then the woman took the two men and hid them. So she said, “Yes, the men came to me, but I did not know where they were from. And it happened as the gate was being shut, when it was dark, that the men went out. Where the men went I do not know; pursue them quickly, for you may overtake them.” (But she had brought them up to the roof and hidden them with the stalks of flax, which she had laid in order on the roof.) Then the men pursued them by the road to the Jordan, to the fords. And as soon as those who pursued them had gone out, they shut the gate.

Now before they lay down, she came up to them on the roof, and said to the men: “I know that the Lord has given you the land, that the terror of you has fallen on us, and that all the inhabitants of the land are fainthearted because of you. 10 For we have heard how the Lord dried up the water of the Red Sea for you when you came out of Egypt, and what you did to the two kings of the Amorites who were on the other side of the Jordan, Sihon and Og, whom you utterly destroyed. 11 And as soon as we heard these things, our hearts melted; neither did there remain any more courage in anyone because of you, for the Lord your God, He is God in heaven above and on earth beneath. 12 Now therefore, I beg you, swear to me by the Lord, since I have shown you kindness, that you also will show kindness to my father’s house, and give me a true token, 13 and spare my father, my mother, my brothers, my sisters, and all that they have, and deliver our lives from death.”

14 So the men answered her, “Our lives for yours, if none of you tell this business of ours. And it shall be, when the Lord has given us the land, that we will deal kindly and truly with you.”

15 Then she let them down by a rope through the window, for her house was on the city wall; she dwelt on the wall. 16 And she said to them, “Get to the mountain, lest the pursuers meet you. Hide there three days, until the pursuers have returned. Afterward you may go your way.”

17 So the men said to her: “We will be blameless of this oath of yours which you have made us swear, 18 unless, when we come into the land, you bind this line of scarlet cord in the window through which you let us down, and unless you bring your father, your mother, your brothers, and all your father’s household to your own home. 19 So it shall be that whoever goes outside the doors of your house into the street, his blood shall be on his own head, and we will be guiltless. And whoever is with you in the house, his blood shall be on our head if a hand is laid on him. 20 And if you tell this business of ours, then we will be free from your oath which you made us swear.”

21 Then she said, “According to your words, so be it.” And she sent them away, and they departed. And she bound the scarlet cord in the window.

22 They departed and went to the mountain, and stayed there three days until the pursuers returned. The pursuers sought them all along the way, but did not find them. 23 So the two men returned, descended from the mountain, and crossed over; and they came to Joshua the son of Nun, and told him all that had befallen them. 24 And they said to Joshua, “Truly the Lord has delivered all the land into our hands, for indeed all the inhabitants of the country are fainthearted because of us.”

Rehab and two spies
Rehab and two spies
woman story

More on a woman who beat the odds

Alice Munro: She’s ours and she’s great

Munro beat the odds, and not the Nobel odds either. All you need to win the Nobel Prize in literature is to write brilliantly for a lifetime.

Who does she think she is?

Well, she’s ours, she’s our great and glorious Alice, our local hero, our gleaming woman of letters, put out more flags, Canadians are fit to burst.

Finally the question that Canadians have asked since Confederation with their Scottish Presbyterian tendency to slice down their tall poppies, their national habit of saving their dishes and linens for a special occasion that never arrives, has been answered.

We are the home of Alice Munro, writer of stories so surgically powerful that loud skeptics asking if anything interesting could come out of small-town southwestern Ontario—Sowesto, as the painter Greg Curnoe called it—read one story, just one, and put the book down in shock and silence.

Munro beat the odds, and not the Nobel odds either. All you need to win the Nobel Prize in literature is to write brilliantly for a lifetime. Many do. But the odds against Munro doing so were Rocky Mountain-high. All the cultural forces gathered against Munro hit her when she was young and at her most porous.

She was born in 1931, a child of the Depression, and worse, a girl, which meant she was in her twenties in the 1950s when women were still considered rubbish. Her life unrolled as it should. There was Munro, a Vancouver housewife having given birth to three children, reading frantically and desperate to write. Her first book, a collection of 15 stories, appeared in 1968, a time when there was no still no such real thing as Canadian literature.

They have never faltered in quality, not since, not now, and the woman is 82.

Here is what Munro does. She studies her fellow humans with an almost indescribable intensity. Brain science is so exciting and excitable now—look, that bit lights up when you have your morning coffee!—but Munro has been doing this in prose for a lifetime.

All people are deeply strange. They have secrets and when you peel them, those secrets come out. I am convinced of this but will never make my case. I don’t need to because Munro has done it already.

Munro thinks you are interesting. You are, maybe not in ways that flatter you, but the Munro scalpel poking inside your silent history will come up with extraordinary things. “A big part of serious fiction’s purpose,” the American novelist David Foster Wallace once said, “is to give the reader, who like all of us is marooned in her own skull, to give her imaginative access to other selves.” Nobody survives a Munro excavation intact.

The great thing about Munro is her allergy to dullness. Give her the most unpromising materials: rural Canada, stomped-on women, pompous men, hard winters, emotional flatness, lives of quiet moneyless desperation, the plainest of foods and no loud talk, a massive “dreariness of spirit.” Munro spins it into gold.

She does not judge, and that’s Munro’s genius. She tunnels into people with the flatness of tone that is her greatest weapon and maps them and the reader is stunned. You, yes you, small Canadian idiot, are interesting. In fact, you should be arrested, prosecuted and jailed for how interesting you are and if there’s a god ruling this earth you will be.

That’s the tone of her landscapes and it provides a bleak hilarity (always the best kind.). As Margaret Atwood has written, “Her acute consciousness of social class, and of the minutiae and sneers separating one level from the next, is honestly come by, as is her characters’ habit of rigorously examining their own deeds, emotions, motives and consciences, and finding them wanting.”

Atwood becomes even more doom-laden and accurate. “Forgiveness is not easily come by, punishments are frequent and harsh, potential humiliation and shame lurk around every corner, and nobody gets away with much.”

She’s talking about you, you little hussy, you jumped-up big city nobody with your shiny subways and your fancy liquors, I’ll teach you. That’s the authentic Canadian voice of disapproval, that’s Harper, that’s Ford, that’s a little voice in all of us.

Munro has heard that voice. She has spent her life laughing at it, recording it for centuries to come, and in the lives of girls and women, silencing it.

“Alice, come out from behind the tool shed and pick up the phone,” tweeted Margaret Atwood on being told that the Nobel Committee had had the most difficult time getting ahold of Munro very early this morning to tell her the news.

How wonderful. That’s Munro dialogue. Who do you think you are, Alice, sleeping off a party while perfectly nice Swedes are trying to give you a million dollars and some bubbly champagne nonsense. Answer the phone, Alice. That’s a nation crying out to you. Take that call.

alice_munro200

woman story

Lives and Love of Girls and Women

Quoted News: This week all of Canada is celebrating the awarding of the Nobel Prize for Literature to Alice Munro. This country is blessed with many great authors but Munro’s very personal stories with their explicit Canadian roots make a special contribution to our literary heritage. Munro is the first Canadian and only the 13th woman to win the award. She divides her time between Clinton, Ontario and Comox.

You can read many of her stories on-line at the New Yorker’s web site. Historica Canada has a brief reading from “How I Met My Husband“  as part of the Radio Minutes collection and the CBC Digital Archives has eight interviews with the author from 1974 to 2007. A most entertaining account of Alice Munro’s character is from her publisher, Douglas Gibson. http://www.bcheritagefairs.ca/alice-munro/

Alice Ann Munro (née Laidlaw; born 10 July 1931) is a Canadian author writing in English. The recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature and the 2009 Man Booker International Prize for her lifetime body of work, she is also a three-time winner of Canada’s Governor General’s Award for fiction.[1][2][3]

The focus of Munro’s fiction is her native southwestern Ontario.[4] Her “accessible, moving stories” explore human complexities in a seemingly effortless style.[5] Munro’s writing has established her as “one of our greatest contemporary writers of fiction,” or, as Cynthia Ozick put it, “our Chekhov.”[6] In 2013, Munro was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for her work as “master of the modern short story”.

Munro was born in Wingham, Ontario. Her father, Robert Eric Laidlaw, was a fox and mink farmer,[7] and her mother, Anne Clarke Laidlaw (née Chamney), was a schoolteacher. Munro began writing as a teenager, publishing her first story, “The Dimensions of a Shadow,” in 1950 while a student at the University of Western Ontario. During this period she worked as a waitress, a tobacco picker, and a library clerk. In 1951, she left the university, where she had been majoring in English since 1949, to marry fellow student James Munro. In 1963 the couple moved to Victoria where they opened Munro’s Books which still operates.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Munro

Book Reviews – Fiction, June 2010, By Lisa Aldridge http://www.lancetteer.com/book33.htm

book review on Lives of Girls and Women: (Lives of Girls and Women is a short story cycle by Alice Munro, published by McGraw-Hill Ryerson in 1971. All of the stories chronicle the life of a single character, Del Jordan, and the book has been characterized as a novel by some critics as a result.)

Alice Munro’s Lives of Girls and Women is a coming-of-age tale of a young girl growing up in 1940s rural Ontario. First published in 1971, this semi-autobiographical, feminist work is Munro’s second published piece and perhaps her most famous. Often mistaken for a novel, Lives of Girls is actually a short story cycle: a collection of short, interlinked stories with common themes, characters and a central protagonist who provides harmony and links the entire work. Contrary to a traditional novel, each chapter (or cycle) is capable of standing independently as its own short story, with a proper conflict and resolution, while at the same time providing valuable contrast and progression for the overall story.

Lives of Girls and Women is the story is of Del Jordon, a precocious young girl who does not seem to quite fit in with the townspeople and country lifestyle of her small town, Jubilee. In each chapter Del faces a different trial or issue, which help the reader to understand the overall themes of love, friendship, sexuality, religion and death.

With subtlety and humor, Munro highlights the undertones of everyday activities and the complexities of various types of relationships. Del is greatly affected by the relationships she has with the people around her, some of whom can be seen as role models, while others are anti-role models. Del identifies and questions various character traits of the people most influential in her life (especially her mother) and tries to choose which characteristics she will adopt and which ones she will attempt to avoid as she constructs her own self-image. But ultimately, Del struggles to develop a concrete sense of self in what appears to her as an ever-changing, incomprehensible world. For to know herself, she must understand at least something about the world and her proper place in it.

Del reaches maturity in the final chapter, appropriately named, Baptism (signifying her rebirth). Throughout this lengthy chapter, Del undergoes a number of rebirths due to her newly discovered sexuality and her relationship with her first love, Garnet French. Del’s final (and quite literal) ‘baptism,’ culminates in her realization that being in love has colored her perception of the world around her, in a dream-like, almost whimsical way. Like many who first fall in love, she has lost—or at least forgotten, temporarily—who she really is and what is important to her. And yet, choosing to be in love over being one’s self is perhaps a necessary process. Del is stronger and more connected to her true self for having gone through her relationship with Garnet. This final rebirth helps set her on her proper path, and marks the completion of her move from childhood to adulthood.

Del’s destiny is to become a writer. But she cannot become an artist, until she has come of age, an interconnected process (see Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man). Yet, in this case, the artist is (finally!) a young woman. Once Del has grown up, she feels that the only appropriate thing for her to do with her life is to write a novel. With this decision, Del moves from being an active participant in her own life to a more passive observer of the world around her. She has become wholly removed from her own life and decides to create a completely new one, in any way she sees fit. This narrative shift is unsettling for the reader because by this point, Del has become the author of her own story. On the other hand, the ease with which she moves from actor to writer illustrates just how closely the two are linked. To some extent, we are all writers of our own personal stories, our histories, and based on the choices we make, we are largely in control of our destiny.

Even before Del makes the decision to become a novelist, she describes her own life in a dramatic, fictionalized way. While waiting to see if Garnet will show up, she says:

“I combed my hair and waited, classically, behind the curtains in our front room.
Without diminishment of pain I observed myself; I was amazed to think that the person suffering was me, for it was not me at all; I was watching. I was watching, I was suffering.

Del’s dramatic interpretation of this moment shows that she has already begun to feel removed from her own life as she becomes an observer of experience. In the epilog, as Del struggles with her writing, she explains that:

It did not occur to me that one day I would be so greedy for Jubilee… [that] I would want to write things down. ..the hope of accuracy we bring to such tasks is crazy, heartbreaking. ..for what I wanted was every last thing, every layer of speech and thought, stroke of light on bark or walls, every smell, pothole, pain, crack, delusion, held still and held together—radiant, everlasting.”

This description gives the reader some insight into the difficulty, and at times, futility, of being a writer. As Del attempts to transform her everyday reality into a fictionalized version, Munro hints at her parallel experience of converting her own south western Ontario town into the ordinary reality of the fictional town of Jubilee. Munro’s detailed descriptions of country life successfully create an extraordinary sense of place and time. Yet, for both Munro and Del, the desire is strong to capture every last detail, to properly illustrate the beauty, complexity and subtlety of rural life. Lives of Girls and Women reveals that even for the most adept writer, creating fiction rooted in reality is a difficult, if not impossible, task to achieve. 

Another book review is excerpted as follows:

Lives of Girls and Women (1971)

Early in “Lives of Girls and Women”, readers learn that Jubilee is “not part of town, but it was not part of the country either”. Del Jordan isn’t exactly sure where she belongs either…

Readers of Alice Munro’s first collection will also recognize that sense of being in-between. Between town and country, yes. But also between girlhood and womanhood.

And they’ll recognize Del Jordan from two of the early stories, “Walker Brothers Cowboy” and “Images”. (And I have the idea that “Boys and Girls is about Del too, but I’m not certain of that yet.)

Every story in Lives of Girls and Women, however, features Del Jordan. Some readers think that makes the book a novel rather than a collection of stories. But Alice Munro is a short story writer…

Nonetheless, I like the idea of settling into Del Jordan’s world for more than a single story.

There, in Jubilee and on The Flats Road, we meet Mitch Plim and the Potter boys –bootleggers– and bachelor Sandy Stevenson who keeps a grey donkey, and we hear tell of Charlie Buckle’s store and Mrs. McQuade’s whorehouse, and there are doings with Irene Pollox and Frankie Hall, who are a little ‘touched’.

And speaking of ‘touched’, there’s Uncle Benny, who keeps e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g and Madeleine, what some might call a ‘real piece of work’…

In “The Flats Road” we get reacquainted with Jubilee and Del, and Del gets acquainted with madness. This continues in “Heirs of the Living Body”, wherein Del interacts with Aunt Moira’s daughter, Mary Agnes (who “is not an idiot”)…

Life in the Jordan home strikes me as both bizarre and ordinary. The propensity for practical jokes add some sparkle to the idea of traditional tales of town-life (or, near-town-life) — and I found myself grinning at the antics…ironically, Del notes that the “worst thing that could happen in this life was to have people laughing at you”.

But this was in stark contrast to the more sober and sombre realities of life there. I also found myself immediately and readily responding to Del’s feelings of inadequacy, her inherent feelings of “not measuring up”…

Del observes: “He [Uncle Craig] himself was not hurt or diminished in any way by my unsatisfactoriness, though he would point it out. This was the great difference between disappointing him and disappointing somebody like my mother…”

And, yet, if I recall correctly (from my first reading of this collection, about twenty years ago), Del comes to view her relationship with her mother somewhat differently, if not more positively…

Nonetheless, she becomes (I think) increasingly aware of the connections between the women in her family. Much as is hinted in her consideration of Uncle Craig’s research into family history: “It was not the individual names that were important, but the whole solid, intricate structure of lives supporting us from the past.”

That which supports us and that which falls through: the first two stories in Lives of Girls and Women consider madness and loss, and the intersections between these states. It might not sound like gripping reading, but I am heartfully absorbed by it…See more at: http://www.buriedinprint.com/?p=3135#sthash.819Q6Zb5.dpuf

Munro-Lives-Girls-Women alice munroYoungAlice

Lives of Girls and Women (1971) I

Early in Lives of Girls and Women, readers learn that Jubilee is “not part of town, but it was not part of the country either”. Del Jordan isn’t exactly sure where she belongs either.

Readers of Dance of the Happy Shades will recognize Jubilee; some of its stories take place overtly in Jubilee too, and others might as well (but not “Sunday Afternoon”, “A Trip to the Coast” or “Dance of the Happy Shades”) although sometimes the small town setting is not identified.

Readers of Alice Munro’s first collection will also recognize that sense of being in-between. Between town and country, yes. But also between girlhood and womanhood.

And they’ll recognize Del Jordan from two of the early stories, “Walker Brothers Cowboy” and “Images”. (And I have the idea that “Boys and Girls is about Del too, but I’m not certain of that yet.)

Every story in Lives of Girls and Women, however, features Del Jordan. Some readers think that makes the book a novel rather than a collection of stories. But Alice Munro is a short story writer.

(That must have been a marketing ploy, scribbling ‘novel’ across the cover of some editions, but I can’t sneer at it because I’ve had a lot of years resisting short stories myself: the then-story-resisting-reader in me might well have picked this up as a novel and overlooked it as a collection. And I wouldn’t have wanted to have missed out.)

Nonetheless, I like the idea of settling into Del Jordan’s world for more than a single story.

There, in Jubilee and on The Flats Road, we meet Mitch Plim and the Potter boys –bootleggers– and bachelor Sandy Stevenson who keeps a grey donkey, and we hear tell of Charlie Buckle’s store and Mrs. McQuade’s whorehouse, and there are doings with Irene Pollox and Frankie Hall, who are a little ‘touched’.

And speaking of ‘touched’, there’s Uncle Benny, who keeps e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g and Madeleine, what some might call a ‘real piece of work’.

(The heart of the story is right in there, and there’s a lot to say about the two of them, but I’ll leave that for anyone who might like to leave a comment with a spoiler alert: what a lot of questions this storyline raises!)

In “The Flats Road” we get reacquainted with Jubilee and Del, and Del gets acquainted with madness. This continues in “Heirs of the Living Body”, wherein Del interacts with Aunt Moira’s daughter, Mary Agnes (who “is not an idiot”), but in the second story, Del is primarily preoccupied by a death in the family.

Life in the Jordan home strikes me as both bizarre and ordinary. The propensity for practical jokes add some sparkle to the idea of traditional tales of town-life (or, near-town-life) — and I found myself grinning at the antics of Aunt Elspeth and Auntie Grace, although, ironically, Del notes that the “worst thing that could happen in this life was to have people laughing at you”.

But this was in stark contrast to the more sober and sombre realities of life there. I also found myself immediately and readily responding to Del’s feelings of inadequacy, her inherent feelings of “not measuring up”. (This is also, partly, why I think she might be the narrator in “Boys and Girls”, at least in spirit, but her feelings of falling short are also recalled in “Red Dress-1946, which was definitely not a Del story. Perhaps it’s shared by more girls than not.)

Del observes: “He [Uncle Craig] himself was not hurt or diminished in any way by my unsatisfactoriness, though he would point it out. This was the great difference between disappointing him and disappointing somebody like my mother…”

And, yet, if I recall correctly (from my first reading of this collection, about twenty years ago), Del comes to view her relationship with her mother somewhat differently, if not more positively. (Although I think she continues to struggle with the sense of disappointing other people who have varying expectations of her.)

Nonetheless, she becomes (I think) increasingly aware of the connections between the women in her family. Much as is hinted in her consideration of Uncle Craig’s research into family history: “It was not the individual names that were important, but the whole solid, intricate structure of lives supporting us from the past.”

That which supports us and that which falls through: the first two stories in Lives of Girls and Women consider madness and loss, and the intersections between these states. It might not sound like gripping reading, but I am heartfully absorbed by it.

It’s not too late to join in, if you’ve yet to sample Munro’s stories, or if you’re curious about her earlier collections. Doncha want to?

– See more at: http://www.buriedinprint.com/?p=3135#sthash.819Q6Zb5.dpuf

Lives of Girls and Women (1971) I

Early in Lives of Girls and Women, readers learn that Jubilee is “not part of town, but it was not part of the country either”. Del Jordan isn’t exactly sure where she belongs either.

Readers of Dance of the Happy Shades will recognize Jubilee; some of its stories take place overtly in Jubilee too, and others might as well (but not “Sunday Afternoon”, “A Trip to the Coast” or “Dance of the Happy Shades”) although sometimes the small town setting is not identified.

Readers of Alice Munro’s first collection will also recognize that sense of being in-between. Between town and country, yes. But also between girlhood and womanhood.

And they’ll recognize Del Jordan from two of the early stories, “Walker Brothers Cowboy” and “Images”. (And I have the idea that “Boys and Girls is about Del too, but I’m not certain of that yet.)

Every story in Lives of Girls and Women, however, features Del Jordan. Some readers think that makes the book a novel rather than a collection of stories. But Alice Munro is a short story writer.

(That must have been a marketing ploy, scribbling ‘novel’ across the cover of some editions, but I can’t sneer at it because I’ve had a lot of years resisting short stories myself: the then-story-resisting-reader in me might well have picked this up as a novel and overlooked it as a collection. And I wouldn’t have wanted to have missed out.)

Nonetheless, I like the idea of settling into Del Jordan’s world for more than a single story.

There, in Jubilee and on The Flats Road, we meet Mitch Plim and the Potter boys –bootleggers– and bachelor Sandy Stevenson who keeps a grey donkey, and we hear tell of Charlie Buckle’s store and Mrs. McQuade’s whorehouse, and there are doings with Irene Pollox and Frankie Hall, who are a little ‘touched’.

And speaking of ‘touched’, there’s Uncle Benny, who keeps e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g and Madeleine, what some might call a ‘real piece of work’.

(The heart of the story is right in there, and there’s a lot to say about the two of them, but I’ll leave that for anyone who might like to leave a comment with a spoiler alert: what a lot of questions this storyline raises!)

In “The Flats Road” we get reacquainted with Jubilee and Del, and Del gets acquainted with madness. This continues in “Heirs of the Living Body”, wherein Del interacts with Aunt Moira’s daughter, Mary Agnes (who “is not an idiot”), but in the second story, Del is primarily preoccupied by a death in the family.

Life in the Jordan home strikes me as both bizarre and ordinary. The propensity for practical jokes add some sparkle to the idea of traditional tales of town-life (or, near-town-life) — and I found myself grinning at the antics of Aunt Elspeth and Auntie Grace, although, ironically, Del notes that the “worst thing that could happen in this life was to have people laughing at you”.

But this was in stark contrast to the more sober and sombre realities of life there. I also found myself immediately and readily responding to Del’s feelings of inadequacy, her inherent feelings of “not measuring up”. (This is also, partly, why I think she might be the narrator in “Boys and Girls”, at least in spirit, but her feelings of falling short are also recalled in “Red Dress-1946, which was definitely not a Del story. Perhaps it’s shared by more girls than not.)

Del observes: “He [Uncle Craig] himself was not hurt or diminished in any way by my unsatisfactoriness, though he would point it out. This was the great difference between disappointing him and disappointing somebody like my mother…”

And, yet, if I recall correctly (from my first reading of this collection, about twenty years ago), Del comes to view her relationship with her mother somewhat differently, if not more positively. (Although I think she continues to struggle with the sense of disappointing other people who have varying expectations of her.)

Nonetheless, she becomes (I think) increasingly aware of the connections between the women in her family. Much as is hinted in her consideration of Uncle Craig’s research into family history: “It was not the individual names that were important, but the whole solid, intricate structure of lives supporting us from the past.”

That which supports us and that which falls through: the first two stories in Lives of Girls and Women consider madness and loss, and the intersections between these states. It might not sound like gripping reading, but I am heartfully absorbed by it.

It’s not too late to join in, if you’ve yet to sample Munro’s stories, or if you’re curious about her earlier collections. Doncha want to?

– See more at: http://www.buriedinprint.com/?p=3135#sthash.819Q6Zb5.dpuf

Lives of Girls and Women (1971) I

Early in Lives of Girls and Women, readers learn that Jubilee is “not part of town, but it was not part of the country either”. Del Jordan isn’t exactly sure where she belongs either.

Readers of Dance of the Happy Shades will recognize Jubilee; some of its stories take place overtly in Jubilee too, and others might as well (but not “Sunday Afternoon”, “A Trip to the Coast” or “Dance of the Happy Shades”) although sometimes the small town setting is not identified.

Readers of Alice Munro’s first collection will also recognize that sense of being in-between. Between town and country, yes. But also between girlhood and womanhood.

And they’ll recognize Del Jordan from two of the early stories, “Walker Brothers Cowboy” and “Images”. (And I have the idea that “Boys and Girls is about Del too, but I’m not certain of that yet.)

Every story in Lives of Girls and Women, however, features Del Jordan. Some readers think that makes the book a novel rather than a collection of stories. But Alice Munro is a short story writer.

(That must have been a marketing ploy, scribbling ‘novel’ across the cover of some editions, but I can’t sneer at it because I’ve had a lot of years resisting short stories myself: the then-story-resisting-reader in me might well have picked this up as a novel and overlooked it as a collection. And I wouldn’t have wanted to have missed out.)

Nonetheless, I like the idea of settling into Del Jordan’s world for more than a single story.

There, in Jubilee and on The Flats Road, we meet Mitch Plim and the Potter boys –bootleggers– and bachelor Sandy Stevenson who keeps a grey donkey, and we hear tell of Charlie Buckle’s store and Mrs. McQuade’s whorehouse, and there are doings with Irene Pollox and Frankie Hall, who are a little ‘touched’.

And speaking of ‘touched’, there’s Uncle Benny, who keeps e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g and Madeleine, what some might call a ‘real piece of work’.

(The heart of the story is right in there, and there’s a lot to say about the two of them, but I’ll leave that for anyone who might like to leave a comment with a spoiler alert: what a lot of questions this storyline raises!)

In “The Flats Road” we get reacquainted with Jubilee and Del, and Del gets acquainted with madness. This continues in “Heirs of the Living Body”, wherein Del interacts with Aunt Moira’s daughter, Mary Agnes (who “is not an idiot”), but in the second story, Del is primarily preoccupied by a death in the family.

Life in the Jordan home strikes me as both bizarre and ordinary. The propensity for practical jokes add some sparkle to the idea of traditional tales of town-life (or, near-town-life) — and I found myself grinning at the antics of Aunt Elspeth and Auntie Grace, although, ironically, Del notes that the “worst thing that could happen in this life was to have people laughing at you”.

But this was in stark contrast to the more sober and sombre realities of life there. I also found myself immediately and readily responding to Del’s feelings of inadequacy, her inherent feelings of “not measuring up”. (This is also, partly, why I think she might be the narrator in “Boys and Girls”, at least in spirit, but her feelings of falling short are also recalled in “Red Dress-1946, which was definitely not a Del story. Perhaps it’s shared by more girls than not.)

Del observes: “He [Uncle Craig] himself was not hurt or diminished in any way by my unsatisfactoriness, though he would point it out. This was the great difference between disappointing him and disappointing somebody like my mother…”

And, yet, if I recall correctly (from my first reading of this collection, about twenty years ago), Del comes to view her relationship with her mother somewhat differently, if not more positively. (Although I think she continues to struggle with the sense of disappointing other people who have varying expectations of her.)

Nonetheless, she becomes (I think) increasingly aware of the connections between the women in her family. Much as is hinted in her consideration of Uncle Craig’s research into family history: “It was not the individual names that were important, but the whole solid, intricate structure of lives supporting us from the past.”

That which supports us and that which falls through: the first two stories in Lives of Girls and Women consider madness and loss, and the intersections between these states. It might not sound like gripping reading, but I am heartfully absorbed by it.

It’s not too late to join in, if you’ve yet to sample Munro’s stories, or if you’re curious about her earlier collections. Doncha want to?

– See more at: http://www.buriedinprint.com/?p=3135#sthash.819Q6Zb5.dpuf

God's creation, word roadmap

Global love famine: random hearing and solution

A STUDY ON FIRST BIBLE LOVE STORY : SOLUTIONS FOR LOVE FAMINE (SCROLL TO END TO SEE SUMMARY OF FINDINGS)

GENESIS ONE: 29-30

29:6 Now Laban had two daughters. The older daughter was named Leah, and the younger one was Rachel. 17 There was no sparkle in Leah’s eyes, but Rachel had a beautiful figure and a lovely face. 18 Since Jacob was in love with Rachel, he told her father, “I’ll work for you for seven years if you’ll give me Rachel, your younger daughter, as my wife.”

19 “Agreed!” Laban replied. “I’d rather give her to you than to anyone else. Stay and work with me.” 20 So Jacob worked seven years to pay for Rachel. But his love for her was so strong that it seemed to him but a few days.

21 Finally, the time came for him to marry her. “I have fulfilled my agreement,” Jacob said to Laban. “Now give me my wife so I can sleep with her.”

22 So Laban invited everyone in the neighborhood and prepared a wedding feast. 23 But that night, when it was dark, Laban took Leah to Jacob, and he slept with her. 24 (Laban had given Leah a servant, Zilpah, to be her maid.)

25 But when Jacob woke up in the morning—it was Leah! “What have you done to me?” Jacob raged at Laban. “I worked seven years for Rachel! Why have you tricked me?”

26 “It’s not our custom here to marry off a younger daughter ahead of the firstborn,” Laban replied. 27 “But wait until the bridal week is over, then we’ll give you Rachel, too—provided you promise to work another seven years for me.

28 So Jacob agreed to work seven more years. A week after Jacob had married Leah, Laban gave him Rachel, too. 29 (Laban gave Rachel a servant, Bilhah, to be her maid.) 30 So Jacob slept with Rachel, too, and he loved her much more than Leah. He then stayed and worked for Laban the additional seven years.

Jacob’s Many Children

31 When the Lord saw that Leah was unloved, he enabled her to have children, but Rachel could not conceive. 32 So Leah became pregnant and gave birth to a son. She named him Reuben, for she said, “The Lord has noticed my misery, and now my husband will love me.”

33 She soon became pregnant again and gave birth to another son. She named him Simeon, for she said, “The Lord heard that I was unloved and has given me another son.”

34 Then she became pregnant a third time and gave birth to another son. She named him Levi, for she said, “Surely this time my husband will feel affection for me, since I have given him three sons!”

35 Once again Leah became pregnant and gave birth to another son. She named him Judah, for she said, “Now I will praise the Lord!” And then she stopped having children.

30:1 When Rachel saw that she wasn’t having any children for Jacob, she became jealous of her sister. She pleaded with Jacob, “Give me children, or I’ll die!”

2 Then Jacob became furious with Rachel. Am I God?” he asked. “He’s the one who has kept you from having children!”

3 Then Rachel told him, “Take my maid, Bilhah, and sleep with her. She will bear children for me, and through her I can have a family, too.” 4 So Rachel gave her servant, Bilhah, to Jacob as a wife, and he slept with her. 5 Bilhah became pregnant and presented him with a son. 6 Rachel named him Dan, for she said, “God has vindicated me! He has heard my request and given me a son.” 7 Then Bilhah became pregnant again and gave Jacob a second son. 8 Rachel named him Naphtali, for she said, “I have struggled hard with my sister, and I’m winning!”

9 Meanwhile, Leah realized that she wasn’t getting pregnant anymore, so she took her servant, Zilpah, and gave her to Jacob as a wife. 10 Soon Zilpah presented him with a son. 11 Leah named him Gad, for she said, “How fortunate I am!” 12 Then Zilpah gave Jacob a second son. 13 And Leah named him Asher, for she said, “What joy is mine! Now the other women will celebrate with me.”

14 One day during the wheat harvest, Reuben found some mandrakes growing in a field and brought them to his mother, Leah. Rachel begged Leah, “Please give me some of your son’s mandrakes.”

15 But Leah angrily replied, “Wasn’t it enough that you stole my husband? Now will you steal my son’s mandrakes, too?”

Rachel answered, “I will let Jacob sleep with you tonight if you give me some of the mandrakes.”

16 So that evening, as Jacob was coming home from the fields, Leah went out to meet him. “You must come and sleep with me tonight!” she said. “I have paid for you with some mandrakes that my son found.” So that night he slept with Leah. 17 And God answered Leah’s prayers. She became pregnant again and gave birth to a fifth son for Jacob. 18 She named him Issachar, for she said, “God has rewarded me for giving my servant to my husband as a wife.” 19 Then Leah became pregnant again and gave birth to a sixth son for Jacob. 20 She named him Zebulun, for she said, “God has given me a good reward. Now my husband will treat me with respect, for I have given him six sons.” 21 Later she gave birth to a daughter and named her Dinah.

22 Then God remembered Rachel’s plight and answered her prayers by enabling her to have children. 23 She became pregnant and gave birth to a son. “God has removed my disgrace,” she said. 24 And she named him Joseph, for she said, “May the Lord add yet another son to my family.”

_____________________________

ImageHERE ARE SOME RANDOM THOUGHTS (IN NO PARTICULAR SEQUENCE) AS I PONDERED OVER THIS TYPICAL LOVE STORY WHICH STILL RE-ENACTS DAILY ON AND AROUND THE GLOBE:

FIRST LOVE STORY IN THE BIBLE REVEALED THE FOLLOWING:

1. THAT THERE WAS ALREADY A FAMINE FOR LOVE IN HUMAN, JUST AS GOD HAD DECREED OVER EVE.

GEN3:16 “To the woman He said:

“I will greatly multiply your sorrow and your conception;
In pain you shall bring forth children;
Your desire shall be for your husband,
And he shall rule over you.”   (NKJV)

2. THE WOMAN WHO DID NOT HAVE THE LOVE OF HER HUSBAND LOOKED FOR AFFIRMATION FROM GIVING BIRTH TO SONS (CHILDREN). A CHILDLESS WOMAN WAS CONSIDERED A DISGRACE. RACHAEL SUFFERED TO THE EXTENT SHE SAID SHE WOULD DIE IF REMAINING CHILDLESS!

3. WOMEN LIKE LEAH WAS UNLOVED BY HUSBANDS SO SHE SOUGHT AFFIRMATION OF HER ROLE AND STATUS BY BECOMING A MOTHER TO MANY SONS (AND ONE DAUGHTER TOO).

4. IN ALL THESE GOD ACTUALLY SAW AND HEARD THEIR PRAYERS. HE ANSWERED.

5. GOD HAS PLAN. HE FOLLOWS HIS PLAN.

6. HIS PLAN INCLUDES WOMEN, STARTING FROM EVE, WHOSE NAME MEANT MOTHER OF ALL WHO LIVE.

7. HIS PLAN INCLUDES MAN, STARTING WITH ADAM, OBVIOUSLY.

8. ONE VERY PROMINENT THEME THAT STANDS OUT IS : LOVE. THE GREAT CRY FOR LOVE!